October 3rd was German Unity Day, a public holiday celebrating Germany’s unity and the anniversary of Germany’s reunification in 1990.  As part of the festivities, admission was free to the German History Museum in Berlin, so a friend and I made a visit.

The museum building itself used to be an armory. In commemoration of that history, the museum keeps cannons within the courtyard. While the building itself has been extensively renovated, the busts/statues above the courtyard doorways and windows are centuries old.  (See photo below)

Interior courtyard at Deutsches Historisches Museum

Interior courtyard at Deutsches Historisches Museum

As a graduate of Carleton College, I couldn’t help but notice the bust of Schiller:

Bust of Schiller at Deutsches Historisches Museum

Bust of Schiller at Deutsches Historisches Museum

As an American, I couldn’t help but notice the portrait of England’s King George III:

Painting of King George III, king of England during the American Revolution, at Deutsches Historisches Museum

Portrait of King George III, king of England during the American Revolution, at Deutsches Historisches Museum

The museum had on display at least two of busts of Goethe, author of Faust and Germany’s most famous writer.  Surprisingly, I was unable to find a bust of Beethoven, Germany’s most famous composer.  (Maybe Schroeder from Peanuts has it out on loan?)

Bust of a younger Goethe at Deutsches Historisches Museum

Bust of a younger Goethe at Deutsches Historisches Museum

Bust of an older Goethe at Deutsches Historisches Museum

Bust of an older Goethe at Deutsches Historisches Museum