Reasonably dry seats while waiting for the Tram

The seats at my tram stop are downward-tilting so that when it rains most of the water runs off of it. This makes it easier for me to wipe off and sit on when it’s rainy. This doesn’t qualify as “German engineering” of the type you might see on some car commercial, but I appreciate it in any case.

The seats at my tram stop are downward-tilting so that when it rains most of the water runs off of it.  This makes it easier for me to wipe off and sit on a rainy day.  I'm not sure if this qualifies as "German engineering," but I appreciate it.

Mini-Brandenberg Gates

The windows in the subway cars aren’t completely clear: they have little Brandenburg Gate patterns, which my flatmate says is a way to deter vandalism/tagging. I tend to believe him on this point — I’ve seen more spraypaint here in public spaces than in any city I’ve ever visited.

The windows in the subway cars aren't completely clear: they have little Brandenburg Gate patterns, which my flatmate says is a way to deter vandalism/tagging.  (I tend to believe him on this point; goodness knows there's plenty of spray paint visible in Berlin public spaces.)

Pizza without unrecognizable ingredients (I assume)

What do you notice about the ingredients in this cheap box of three frozen pizzas that I bought from the grocery store? Unlike most frozen pizzas in the U.S., there are no additives with long, scientific-sounding names. Instead, the ingredients are all usual things like wheat flour (weizenmehl), Mozzarrella, etc.

One caveat – I’m assuming this means that the extra scientific-sounding additives aren’t included in the pizza, but I’m not sure. It could be that Germany has weaker regulations on the listing of ingredients. If anyone knows for sure, please leave a comment below.

20130930_103948

20130930_103948